Tuesday, May 15, 2018

More Yankee Quiz - Test Your Yankee Knowledge!


More Yankee Quiz

by Harvey Frommer

You asked and now you receive – questions simple, weird, relevant, irrelevant, but all New York Yankees related.
 Take the quiz and see how much you know.


51. Who wore uniform Number 2 before Derek Jeter?

52. Who originally designed the intertwined Yankees logo, “NY”?
      A. Jake Ruppert B. NYC Police Department C. Tiffany D. A fan

53.   First-baseman Wally Pipp has gone down in history for being the       player Lou Gehrig replaced. What other distinction belongs to Pipp?
A. He was a manager.  B. He came from the same neighborhood Gehrig grew up in.  C. He was a home run champ.  D. He made money endorsing aspirin.


54. Who was the first major leaguer to hit two grand slams in the same game? 


55.    Who played the most games for the Yankees?
  A. Mickey Mantle    B.  Yogi Berra    C.  Lou Gehrig    55. D.  Derek Jeter

56. Who was the first DH to bat? (He was a Yankee)


57. Who was the highest paid Yankee in 1973?


58.  Which pitcher became the highest-paid player in history when he signed a $3.5 million contract for the Yankees in 1975?


59. – What Yankee pitcher was nick-named “Bulldog”? 
A.  Jim Bouton B. Monte Pearson C.  Joe Page D. Ron Guidry


60. The tradition of honoring legends at Yankee Stadium started on Memorial Day of 1932. Who was the first monument for? 

61. How many games did Babe Ruth win as pitcher for the Yankees?



62.   Name the Yankees outfielder who won the 1962 AL Rookie of the Year Award when he batted .286 with 20 home runs and 93 RBI.  


63.  For seven consecutive years a New York Mayor threw out the first pitch for the home opener of the Yankees. Who was he?

64. What number did Earl Combs wear and why?

65.  What year did the Yankees begin playing Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York” at the Stadium?


66. Joe DiMaggio, Mickey Mantle, Bernie Williams each spent more than a decade playing centerfield for the Yankees. Who spent the most time?


67. What year did the first All Star Game take place at Yankee Stadium?


68.   Who was the first black player on the Yankees?


69.  Who said: “I may not have been the greatest Yankee to put on the uniform, but I am the proudest.”


70.  Who wrote “New York, New York” the song sung by Frank Sinatra at the Stadium?




                       ANSWERS BELOW


No PEEKING

51.  A.  Mike Gallego wore it in 1992, 1993 and 1994
52.  C.  The interlocking NY logo was originally designed by Louis C. Tiffany for the NYPD valor medal.
53.   C. Pipp was an American League home run champion in 1916-17.
54.  D. Tony Lazzeri
55. D.  Derek Jeter, 2,747
56.  B. Ron Blomberg  
57.  B. Bobby Murcer made $100,000. Alou and Lyle made $70,000. Stottlemyre earned $78,000
58.  Jim "Catfish" Hunter
59. A. Jim Bouton because of his overbearing nature
60.  B. Miller Huggins
61. C. five and two were complete games.
62.  Tom Tresh 
63.  C. Fiorello LaGuadia    (1939-45)
64.  A. 1 because he batted first in a Yankee lineup that began the practice of wearing numbers.
65.  D. 1980
66.  B. Mantle, 15 years
67.  C.   1939, to coincide with the World’s Fair that year
68.  April 14, 1955, the second game of the year, Elston Howard debuted.
69.  D.  Billy Martin
70.   B. Kander and Ebb


About
Harvey
Frommer
One of the most prolific and respected sports journalists and oral historians in the United States, author of the autobiographies of legends Nolan Ryan, Tony Dorsett, and Red Holzman, Dr. Harvey Frommer is an expert on the New York Yankees and has arguably written more books, articles and reviews on the New York Yankees than anyone.  A professor for more than two decades in the MALS program at Dartmouth College, Frommer was dubbed “Dartmouth’s Mr. Baseball” by their alumni magazine. He’s also the founder of www.HarveyFrommerSports.com. Some of the material in this piece was taken from his The Ultimate Yankee Book, readily available from the author or Amazon.

http://www.frommerbooks.com/ultimate-yankees.html

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Remembering Ted Williams - Harvey Frommer

Remembering Ted Williams



He was called “the Splendid Splinter,” “the Kid,” “Teddy Ballgame” and other unmentionable names. But Ted Williams was always something else.

There was the love-hate affair fans at Fenway Park had with Ted Williams.  He dropped  a fly ball in the first game of a doubleheader. Raucous razzing followed.  In the second game, a ball scooted past him in left field, and he made a half hearted effort to go after it. Three runs scored. The booing was deafening. The inning ended. Williams came to the dugout, stopped and made a negative, some would say, obscene gesture --  twice.

ROGER KAHN: Every once in a while, Williams would lose his temper and give them the finger. People out in left field would jeer. There was a constant clash between Williams and the customers.    
BOB BRADY:  But in those years he was the only reason to go to Fenway Park. As soon as his last at bat many would depart especially if the Sox were losing. 
ROGER KAHN: At that time, the Red Sox clubhouse  closed something like 40 minutes before a game at the request, no the demand of  Williams who called reporters the “Knights of the Keyboard.” 
There were more bodies than you could imagine in the Fenway press box, people from all of the papers.  Platoons of reporters.  Somebody doing the pregame color—this is when the Yankees came in.  Somebody doing the dressing room   Somebody doing the other dressing room  Somebody doing crowd notes.  Somebody doing the game itself.  
IKE DELOCK:   He didn’t like the press and there a lot were a lot them – he wanted to ban them from the clubhouse. The players said, “You can’t do that.”  So he eased up.  But whatever he wanted he damn well got.
        At the urging of Williams, Red Sox players agreed to a one hour interview lag after games before reporters could enter the locker room. The Sox icon would stand outside the door wearing just a towel, counting off the seconds. “Okay,” he'd snap. “Now all you bastards can come in. “
MEL PARNELL:  Ted was called out on strikes and came back to the dugout and complained that home plate was out of line. General manager Joe Cronin argued about it but agreed to have home plate checked. At nine the next morning the ground crew was out there. They checked. It was out of line. Ted had the greatest eyes. He was a man with strong opinions about everything, and his own way of doing things.
The “Splendid Splinter” ordered postal scales for the Boston clubhouse to accurately measure the weight of his bats. He trusted no one. While in the on-deck circle, he would massage his bat handle with olive oil and resin. The noise, a kind of squeal, did not endear him to disconcerted pitchers. He was one of the greatest, one of a kind, an original.

About

Harvey

Frommer


One of the most prolific and respected sports journalists and oral historians in the United States, author of the autobiographies of legends Nolan Ryan, Tony Dorsett, and Red Holzman,
 A professor for more than two decades in the MALS program at Dartmouth College, Frommer was dubbed “Dartmouth’s Mr. Baseball” by their alumni magazine. He’s also the founder of www.HarveyFrommerSports.com.
His highly successful THE ULTIMATE YANKEE BOOK is readily available from the author or  Amazon.   http://www.frommerbooks.com/ultimate-yankees.html